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People of the CMLA

Faculty and Students of the CMLA Center

Director: Dr. Daniel Kifer

Department of Computer Science and Engineering

Research Interests:

privacy, databases, machine learning

Biography:

Daniel Kifer received his Ph.D. degree from Cornell University in 2006. He joined the Department of Computer Science at Penn State in Fall 2008 as an assistant professor after a one year postdoctoral position at Yahoo! Research studying information extraction and spam detection. His research interests include machine learning with applications to statistical privacy and analysis of text documents.

 

CSE Dept. Head : Dr. Raj Acharya

Department of Computer Science and Engineering

Research Interests:

Bioinformatics, Data Mining, Netcentric Computing, Information Fusion

Biography:

Professor Raj Acharya obtained his Ph.D from the Mayo Graduate School of Medicine/ University of Minnesota in 1984. Since then, he has worked as a Research Scientist at Mayo Clinic and at GE (Thompson)-CGR in Paris, France. He has also been a Faculty Fellow at the Night Vision Laboratory in Fort Belvoir in Washington D.C. and has been a NASA-ASEE Faculty Fellow at the Johnson Space Center in Houston, Texas. He was the chair of the department of Computer Science and Engineering at SUNY-Buffalo from Fall 1999 till Spring 2001. He is currently the department head of Computer Science and Engineering at the Pennsylvania State University and the director of the Advanced Laboratory for Information Systems & Analysis .

He has been the Chair of Special Sessions in the IEEE International Conference on Multimedia and Expo (July-August, 2000). He is on the editorial board of the International Journal of Computerized Medical Imaging and Graphics. He has been a panel member of the National Institute of Health, BioImaging study section. He was on the scientific board of the IEEE Model Based 3D Biomedical Image Analysis. He was the Session Chair at the 1996 International SPIE Symposium. He was General Chair of 1994 SPIE International Conference on Physiology and Function from Multidimensional Images. He was also Co-Chair of 1994 IEEE Workshop in Biomedical Image Analysis. He was General Chair of SPIE Conference on Biomedical Image Processing (1992 and 1993).

 

Dr. Jesse Barlow

Department of Computer Science and Engineering

Research Interests:

Scientific Computing, Image Processing, Numerical Linear Algebra, Linear Algebra in Signal

Biography:

Jesse Barlow joined the department in September 1981. He has served as a visiting researcher at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, in the Mathematical Sciences Section, 1986 through 1990, and summer 1992. He spent the fall of 1988 at the Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences, New York University; the winter of 1992 at the Institute for Mathematics and Its Applications (at the University of Minnesota) during the Special Year in Applied Linear Algebra; and the spring of 1996 at the Manchester Center for Computational Mathematics at the University of Manchester in Great Britain. Dr. Barlow is the organizer of the International Workshop on Accurate Solution of Eigenvalue Problems, held at University Park, PA, July 20-23, 1998, and is the co-organizer of two related workshops in Germany and Croatia. He is currently an editor for Linear Algebra and Its Applications, International Journal for High Speed Computing, and Computational Statistics and Data Analysis.

Dr. Jia Li

Department of Statistics

Summary of Research:

Her research interests include statistical learning, data mining, image retrieval, image annotation, signal/image processing, bioinformatics, and information theory. Her pioneer work on developing the theory and computational implementations of the 2-D multiresolution hidden Markov models (2-D MHMM) has led to applications in large-scale automated image annotation/classification for art, satellite, and photographic images. Collaborating with biologists, she developed HMM-based techniques to assess the significance of inter-species matches when evolutionary rate varies.

Dr. Francesca Chiaromonte

Department of Statistics

Research Interests:

Statitics, Bioinformatics

Biography:

Dr. Chiaromonte researches simplified representations of high-dimensional problems, with a particular focus on dimension reduction and graphics. She has developed a reduction framework to specify definitions of multivariate structure, and to identify simplified representations preserving structural content that might live in lower dimension. She also works in the field of sufficient dimension reduction for regression, where one identifies reduced predictors processing information on the response.

Dr. Cheng Dong

Department of Bioengineering

Research Interests:

Computational Biology

Biography:

The major focus of Dr. Dong's research is to elucidate biomechanical, biophysical and biochemical aspects of cellular function in the circulatory system. A dual approach is taken that involves a coordination of in vitro biological experiments and mathematical modeling of cellular behavior. Dr. Dong collaborates with biologists at the National Institutes of Health, the Colleges of Science and Medicine at Penn State. Current research in the Cellular Biomechanics Laboratory includes studies of cell deformability, cell adhesion, intercellular and intracellular signaling, and cell motility involved in human immune response and cancer metastasis.

Dr. Qiang Du

Department of Mathematics

Research Interests:

Scientific Computing, Applications in material sciences

Biography:

Dr. Qiang Du's research are in scientific computing and their applications to material sciences. He obtained his Ph.D. from Carnegie Mellon University. He has been professors and researches in Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, the Iowa State University, Michigan State University and Los Alamos National Lab, etc. Dr. Du's research have been funded by NSF. The undergoing projects are Centroidal Voronoi tessellations, algorithms and applications, Algorithms and computations for problems in material sciencs and Multiscale multicomponent computational tools for materials simulations

Dr. Bing Li

Department of Statistics

Research Interests:

Quasi likelihood and estimating equations, Nonparametric and semiparametric estimations, longitudinal data analysis, second-order asymptotics, dimension reduction and Laplace approximations.

Biography:

Dr. Li's main research areas include, first, the quasi-likelihood functions and estimating equations; second, the second-order theories of statistical inference. In the first area, he has focussed on the studies of the likelihood-type functions and their use in estimating equations. Using these functions, he has established the consistency for general estimating equations, namely, that for many estimating equations, it is possible to construct a projected log likelihood ratio, each of whose minimax point is a consistent estimator. This is a more specific consistency result than those previously existed, which in the main only asserted the existence of consistent solutions. As regards the second area, Dr. Li has collaborated with Bruce Lindsay in an investigation of the second-order property of the observed Fisher information. In particular, they have demonstrated that the inverse of the observed Fisher information is the best estimator, among a wide class of estimators, of the realized squared error of the maximum likelihood estimate.

Dr. Richard Li

Department of Statistics

Summary of Research Interests:

Dr. Li is interested in the fields of variable selection, local modeling, functional data analysis and designs of experiment. His primary research focuses on the topics of variable selection and local modeling.
Variable selection is fundamental to statistical modeling. Approaches in use are stepwise selection procedures, such as best subset variable selection and stepwise backward elimination, which can be expensive in computation and ignore stochastic errors in the variable selection process. In Li's works, new approaches are proposed to select significant variables for various statistical models. Based on penalized likelihood, the proposed approaches delete insignificant covariates by estimating their coefficients to be zero, and therefore simultaneously select significant variables and estimate parameters. His work has shown that the proposed approaches have oracle properties; namely, they work as well as if the correct submodel were known.

Dr. Liu Chun

Department of Mathematics

Summary of Research Interests:

Dr. Liu Chun obtained his Ph.D. from New York University. His current research interests center around partial differential equations, calculus of variations and their applications in complex fluids . He is also associated with The Center for Computational Mathematics and Applications .

Dr. David Miller

Department of Electronical Engineering

Biography:

David Miller received the B.S.E. degree from Princeton University in 1987, the M.S.E. degree from the University of Pennsylvania in 1990, and the Ph. D. degree from the University of California at Santa Barbara in 1995, all in electrical engineering. From January 1988 through January 1990, he was employed by General Atronics Corporation in Wyndmoor, Pa. Since August 1995, Dr. Miller has been an assistant professor of electrical engineering at the Pennsylvania State University. Dr. Miller's research interests include source and channel coding, image compression, statistical pattern recognition, and neural networks. Dr. Miller received the National Science Foundation Career Award in 1996, for the continuation of his research on learning algorithms for neural networks.

Dr. Jorge Sofo

Director, Materials Simulation Center

Summary of Research Interests:

Dr. Jorge Sofo's research are primarily in Modeling of materials properties. Electronic structure calculations in solids, surfaces, nanoparticles and molecules.Calculation of transport properties of semiconductors and metals with special emphasis on thermoelectric applications for cooling and power generation. Alloy phase stability and thermodynamic modeling of alloys. Hydrogen storage in intermetallic compounds. Electronic structure and stability of novel materials. Atomistic simulation of metallic coatings on surfaces. Software develop

 
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